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Therapy for Students

Moving away from home as an undergraduate student can feel daunting at the best of times. Although widely acknowledged that developing independent living skills is part of becoming an adult, it is also evident that the pandemic has added to the mental health pressures of first time students.

Therapy 4 Teens, Julie Phillips Therapeutic Coaching, Stokesley, North Yorkshire

Mental health issues among students

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected all our lives throughout 2020.

Moving away from home as an undergraduate student can feel daunting at the best of times. Although widely acknowledged that developing independent living skills is part of becoming an adult, it is also evident that the pandemic has added to the mental health pressures of first time students.

The Students & COVID-19 survey from November 2020 asked over 2,000 students how they really felt about the pandemic. Perhaps unsurprisingly, among those surveyed, as many as two in three students said that their mental health had suffered due to coronavirus.

Another survey of undergraduate students by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI)  asked respondents how the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected their mental health: 58% said their mental health has become worse because of the pandemic.

Many first time higher education students have also found budgeting they are having to learn new skills such as budgeting for the first time and navigating a new town or University campus. They may be living with strangers and, in a unique situation, perhaps even having to isolate in a household with others they do not know well.

Loneliness

Not every first time student is in a shared residence. Some maybe on their own in separate accommodation, this can lead to feelings of isolation and loneliness which can affect mature students too.

It is not always easy to make new friends if you are living a few miles from the university campus where there may be easier access to student facilities. The pandemic has highlighted the impact of social isolation.

A survey by WONKHE and Trendence*** found that in October 2020, compared with May 2019, the proportion of students who felt lonely daily or weekly is much larger (50% compared with 39%), and a larger proportion of students do not feel part of the university community (50% compared with 40%). This is more likely for students living in halls (59%), and least likely for those living with their parents (44%) or in their own home (37%; this will likely comprise mature students).

Add to this social media pressures, exam pressure plus health and financial worries and for students, this can create a toxic overwhelm of daily stress and anxiety. It has been suggested on some media outlets that the pandemic has contributed to a crisis of  mental health issues in university students.

Universities are now more aware of the need to support their students with mental health and wellbeing. Similarly, there is growing pressure on the government to provide more support funding for mental health services for young people. Most university websites will include links to where their students can access counselling services and support. For some students, trying to find help that feels right for them can feel difficult: from a survey reported by FE News in 2020,  of those students  that asked for help, 39% said that it was difficult or very difficult. Only 3% said they found it very easy. It would seem that, for too many students, the support that they need is not as easily accessible as it should be or as is often the case, students just do not know where to start to get the right help they need at the time they need it.

Julie Phillips therapeutic coaching sessions can be accessed easily with a simple click of an  online link. These sessions offer therapeutic support  with a comfortable combination of instant stress reduction therapy, calming hypnotherapy and coaching strategies. These soothing sessions reduce anxiety and stress naturally. Sessions will support students to  create a wellness plan with bespoke resources they can access even after the session.

Sessions for students last 60 minutes and they are an effective way to immediately reduce stress, whilst improving confidence, emotional resilience, and self-esteem. In addition, these session can help improve sleep and reduce workload or exam anxiety.

Perhaps more crucially, these sessions offer a starting point to help students understand that they can feel better quickly and build a personal plan to support their own wellness.

At certain points in life, we may be trying to cope with making mental adjustments so that we can navigate new situations. Becoming a student is a transition point, we may not need lots of counselling – sometimes we just need a bit of ‘hand holding’ to help guide us through the difficult times until we can manage ourselves.

I am DBS Registered with an enhanced certificate and my certification number is 001485689284. Online Sessions for students are offered with a discount. Face to face sessions can also  be arranged if required.

Contact Julie for your free 20 minute phone consultation.

Session details:

Sessions are £65.00 for students. Sessions are one hour sessions

There is a 25% discount for full time students if the session is an online session.

To book a session or for further information, please contact us via our contact page.

25% discount applies to online sessions via Zoom