fbpx

Hypnotherapy can help reduce stress, trauma and anxiety quickly.

One of the areas I focus on as a therapist is stress and  anxiety. I experienced this myself as a teacher and the impact upon my health was serious: I developed IBS (irritable bowel symptoms) and insomnia as a direct result of not managing my stress. Eventually, I discovered Hypnotherapy and was so relieved that […]

One of the areas I focus on as a therapist is stress and  anxiety. I experienced this myself as a teacher and the impact upon my health was serious: I developed IBS (irritable bowel symptoms) and insomnia as a direct result of not managing my stress. Eventually, I discovered Hypnotherapy and was so relieved that there was an easy  way to take back control of my health & wellbeing.

When I decided to train as a clinical hypnotherapist, I discovered much more about the impact of stress on the mind and body. You see, the brain can register a stress response to a situation or event at any time. There is no one way of dealing with stress or trauma however, however in understanding a little more about what can happen means you can decide which therapeutic support may work best for you.
Clients often tell me that their experience of stress has been caused by a particular event that they can remember vividly. In therapeutic terms we call this an ISE (initial sensitising event) something specific that happened and resulted in a stress response for example the death of a partner or close family member.

Sometimes, there may be a sequence of ‘stressful’ events which may have led to feelings of overwhelm, this can happen when clients say that life has become too difficult to cope with. Consistent feelings of  stress can cause physical symptoms too, for example high blood pressure, heart palpitations, acid reflux and IBS (irritable bowel symptoms) can be ‘triggered’ by stress. The impact of stress can be acute if left unmanaged and affect not just the person who is experiencing the symptoms but also those people who live with them.

Trauma

Many people think that the word ‘trauma’  relates to something life altering. A childhood trauma can be a response to being stung by a bee or getting bitten by a dog – this type of trauma, whilst different from adverse childhood events (such as mental or physical abuse),  can also have a significant impact on the brain.

Flight or Fight

If a human system  becomes flooded with adrenaline as a response to stress, that person may want to literally run away – a ‘flight’ response may be the result. The part of the brain that drives the ‘fight’ or ‘flight’ response is called the amygdala. The amygdala is also involved in linking emotional meaning to our memories. reward processing, and decision-making. The amygdala can be stimulated when faced with a perceived threat. If in a threatening situation, the amygdala will send information to other parts of the brain to prepare the body to either face the situation, or to get away from it

Of course, there are people who will go out of their way to avoid potential stressful events. Their anxiety about ‘What if the worst happens?’  can become a constant thought process. Imagine if this was your experience every day? Working out how to avoid something stressful happening or creating stressful future scenarios in your mind and then experiencing the feelings that come from that?  Exhausting!  Too much stress can suppress the  immune system making the body more vulnerable to illness.

Freeze.

If the brain decides that it’s not possible to run away or fight, it can cause people to feel ‘trapped.’ This activates a freeze response which can be a broad spectrum from being unable to speak,  feeling paralysed or unable to respond at all to external events. This is a horrible feeling and a common factor in post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD)  the ‘freezing’ element experienced interrupts the brain’s ability to process trauma.

How can Hypnotherapy help?

I use hypnotherapy in sessions. This  gentle therapeutic work helps people to instantly lower stress levels and reduce the physical symptoms of stress. Hypnotherapy works  with the unconscious mind, the part of  the mind which is the storehouse of your experiences in life and the feelings you’ve had. Sometimes people just do not want to ‘talk’ about the thing that is upsetting to them. Hypnotherapy sessions can be context free and there are effective techniques that I use as a therapist to help release trauma without ever talking about the event or events that may have ‘triggered it.’  With hypnotherapy and trance work,  it is easier to help that part of the brain (which has retained a trauma) to release or process old triggers. It is a bit like helping the brain repair or update an old program, like an outdated computer program. Once the brain has  reduced or released a fear response, I can support my clients by teaching them simple self-hypnosis strategies to help maintain balance and calm.

Hypnotherapy sessions can involve specific techniques which a client can use to help lower anxiety or aid sleep. There are supporting audio resources and clients benefit from listening to audio daily to help them with their progress to a desired outcome.

There is no requirement in a hypnotherapy session  to have to give details past events. Of course, clients often do like to chat or share their thoughts on why they feel the way they do, which is fine.  Every client is and individual, so sessions are created around each client to meet their needs.

Get in touch:

If you feel that hypnotherapy may be something that could help you, do get in touch for a chat on the phone. There is no charge for this.

I offer face to face and online sessions too.

Costs for sessions

All costs and further information are listed here: https://juliephillips-therapeutic-coaching.co.uk/about/#faq

Julie Phillips